Advanced Japanese

JLPT Japanese Proficiency test

The test is designed for non native Japanese learner who would like to test and certify their japanese ability. Since 1984, every December and the first Sunday JLPT exams have been held for students. From 2010 on, the proficiency test has changed from four levels to five levels: N1, N2, N3, N4 and N5. In July 2010, it is decided to hold N1 to N3 three levels in July: including Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan and Hong Kong; while In December all the N1 to N5 exams are organised. In Japan, the JLPT is administered by the Ministry of Education through the Japan Educational Exchanges and Services (JEES). Outside Japan, the Japan Foundation co-sponsors the administration of the test with local cultural exchange and/or educational institutions.

Test Format:

From 2010, the Japanese proficiency test changed from 4 levels to 5 levels: N1, N2, N3, N4, N5. Different test modules and marking criteria are as follows:

Level

CEFR Level

A summary of linguistic competence required for each level

N1

B2+ - C1

Advanced Level: The ability to understand Japanese used in a variety of situations.

Reading

One can read writings with logical complexity and/or abstract writings on a variety of topics, such as newspaper editorials and critiques, and comprehend both their structures and contents. One is also able to read written materials with profound contents on various topics and follow their narratives as well as understand the intent of the writers in a comprehensive way.

Listening

One is able to understand orally presented materials such as coherent conversations, news reports, and lectures, spoken at natural speed in a broad variety of settings, and is able to follow their ideas and comprehend their contents comprehensively. One is also able to comprehend the details of the presented materials such as the relationships among the people involved, the logical structures, and the essential points.

N2

B1+ - B2

Upper-intermediate Level: The ability to understand Japanese used in everyday circumstances, and in a variety of situations to a certain degree.

Reading

One is able to read materials written clearly on a variety of topics, such as articles and commentaries in newspapers and magazines as well as simple critiques, and understand their contents. One is also able to read written materials on general topics and follow their narratives as well as understand the intent of the writers.

Listening

One is able to comprehend orally presented materials such as coherent conversations and news reports, spoken at nearly natural speed in everyday situations as well as in a variety of settings, and is able to follow their ideas and comprehend their contents. One is also able to understand the relationships among the people involved and the essential points of the presented materials.

N3

A2+ - B1

Intermediate Level: The ability to understand Japanese used in everyday situations to a certain degree.

Reading

One is able to read and understand written materials with specific contents concerning everyday topics. One can grasp summary information such as newspaper headlines. In addition, one is also able to read slightly difficult writings encountered in everyday situations and understand the main points of the content if some alternative phrases are available to aid one’s understanding.

Listening

One is able to listen and comprehend coherent conversations in everyday situations, spoken at near-natural speed, and is generally able to follow their contents as well as grasp the relationships among the people involved in the discussions.

N4

A2

Elementary Level: The ability to understand basic Japanese.

Reading

One is able to read and understand passages on familiar daily topics written in basic vocabulary and kanji.

Listening

One is able to listen and comprehend conversations encountered in daily life and generally follow their contents, provided that they are spoken slowly.

N5

A1

Basic Level: The ability to understand some basic Japanese.

Reading

One is able to read and understand typical expressions and sentences written in hiragana, katakana, and basic kanji.

Listening

One is able to listen and comprehend conversations about topics regularly encountered in daily life and classroom situations, and is able to pick up necessary information from short conversations spoken in a slow way.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese-Language_Proficiency_Test

Level

Test section

(test time)

Total duration

N1

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary/Grammar)・Reading

(110 min)

Listening

(60 min)

170 min

N2

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary/Grammar)・Reading

(105 min)

Listening

(50 min)

155 min

N3

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary)

(30 min)

Language Knowledge (Grammar)・Reading

(70 min)

Listening

(40 min)

140 min

N4

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary)

(30 min)

Language Knowledge (Grammar)・Reading

(60 min)

Listening

(35 min)

125 min

N5

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary)

(25 min)

Language Knowledge (Grammar)・Reading

(50 min)

Listening

(30 min)

105 min

   

Sectional pass marks

Level

Overall pass marks

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary/Grammar)・Reading

Listening

N4

90 points

38 points

19 points

N5

80 points

38 points

19 points

   

Sectional pass marks

Level

Overall pass marks

Language Knowledge (Vocabulary/Grammar)

Reading

Listening

N1

100 points

19 points

19 points

19 points

N2

90 points

19 points

19 points

19 points

N3

95 points

19 points

19 points

19 points

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese-Language_Proficiency_Test

Enrolment :

Please consult the following page: https://www.japanese-edu.org.hk/jp/jlpt/en/jlpt.html

Determination of pass / fail

In order to pass, (1) total score needs to be at or above the point required for passing the test (overall pass mark) and (2) score in each scoring section needs to be at or above the minimum point required for passing (sectional pass mark). If there is even one scoring section where the score is below the sectional pass mark, examinees are determined to have failed, no matter how high the total score he/she might have.

Examinees will be judged to have failed if they miss any test section. Although they will receive a Score Report, it will not show scores for any test section, including those that have been taken.

On the exam day:

  1. For participating the test, you must bring the Test Voucher, medium-soft <No. 2 or HB> black-lead pencils, plastic eraser and the ID card/Passport which you used for applying this test. Only the above mentioned materials can be placed on the table.

  2. No admission into the Examination Hall is allowed 10 minutes after the start of the “Language Knowledge” examination. For the “Listening Examination”, no one is allowed to enter the Examination Hall once the question CD is set to run. Candidates who are absent from any section or early leave during the test will obtain no score in all sections.

  3. If you are unable to produce the Test Voucher when participating in the examination, a temporary Test Voucher could be issued on request at the test venue with a handling charge of HK$100.

  4. You are advised to bring your own watch (must be put on your wrist) as a reference to measure the time for the examination because no clock will be set inside the examination centers. Please note that time for the examination is measured according to the watch of the examination instructor. You are not allowed to use your mobile phone for timekeeping during the examination.

  5. There may be extra questions in the Japanese-Language Proficiency Test which do not count toward your score. These questions work in order that the Japan Foundation and Japan Educational Exchanges and Services are able to make test scores comparable across administrations or to determine how new questions function under actual test conditions.

  6. Candidate’s test result will be invalidated if candidate commits a misconduct. No score will be given and test fee is non-refundable.

  7. Your action or attempted action will be considered as misconduct if:

    1. your mobile phone or watch alarm sounds or vibrates during the test;

    2. you have provided others with your answers, obtained answers from other examinees, used a dictionary, textbook, reference book, crib sheet, or mobile phone, written answers in advance on your desk or writing equipment;

    3. you are found to have taken the test in someone else's place, or to have engaged someone to take the test on your behalf, or your identity could not be verified due to the use of a false ID or other such reason;

    4. you refuse to follow the proctor's instructions;

    5. you take the test papers and/or answer sheets outside the test center with you, take photos of the test papers and/or answer sheets, or take the test contents outside the test center by copying them or recording them;

    6. you have disturbed other examinees in any way;

    7. you share the test contents and answers, photos of the test papers/ or answer sheets, or audio content of the listening test via the Internet or any other means of communication with the third party, and vice versa;

    8. you cooperate with someone committing misconduct (2), (3), (5), (6) and/or (7).

Notification of Test Results

  1. All examinees will be notified to collect their score report within a specific period at "Society of Japanese Language Education Hong Kong". Those examinees who successfully pass each level will also receive a proficiency certificate. Score reports and certificates will not be sent by post or delivered to examinees.

  2. Score sheet and certificate for Dec Test will be issued in coming mid-March. Score sheet and certificate for July Test will be issued in coming late September.

  3. The organizer-The Japan Foundation examine all the test papers carefully by checking them many times. Request for additional checking will not be accepted. The organizer will not respond to inquiries regarding test scores.

Q: Are there any ranking systems for Japanese universities?

A: No, Japan doesn’t have an official ranking system for universities. It is recommended that you actively participate in a study-in-Japan fair held in your country or visit the websites of JASSO and various schools to gather information to find a school that best matches your interests.

Q: For some universities, a guarantor is required along with the admission application. Why is that?

A: The reasons why guarantors are required include, for example, financial assurance for the payment of academic fees, and to avoid problems when completing procedures for status of residence upon admission. Students are sometimes required to notify the school of a family member who can be contacted in an emergency.

*All the above information is for reference only. Please refer to the official website for exact information.: http://www.jasso.go.jp/en/study_j/sgtj.html#contents